Last edited by Akilar
Friday, May 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean from the seventh to the tenth century A.D. found in the catalog.

Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean from the seventh to the tenth century A.D.

Aly Mohamed Fahmy

Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean from the seventh to the tenth century A.D.

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Published by National Publication & Print. House in Cairo .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Islamic Empire,
  • Mediterranean Region,
  • Mediterranean Region.
    • Subjects:
    • Ships, Medieval -- Mediterranean Region.,
    • Islamic Empire -- History, Naval.,
    • Mediterranean Region -- History, Naval.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 177-206.

      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDS62.5 .F3
      The Physical Object
      Paginationix, 212 p.
      Number of Pages212
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL269238M
      LC Control Numberne 68000062

      By the seventh century, the term kunlun refer specifically to coastal people of the Malay region. By the ninth century, in Yiqiejing yingyi (), Hui-Lin note that kunlun bo (Malay ship) were arriving regularly at Gulf of Tonkin and along south eastern Chinese coast. Chinese dynasties relations with Malay Archipelago sultanatesAmbassador Bai Tian: Ambassador Zainuddin Yahya. The number of shipwrecks48 in the seventh century is less than half that of the sixth century and becomes a mere tenth in the eighth century. Most ships were now middle-sized ones like the Dor D. Yaacov Lev (ed.), War and Society in the Eastern Mediterranean, 7thth Centuries (Leiden: Brill, ) [Mamluk Studies Review] David Lindholm and David Nicolle, The Scandinavian Baltic Crusades , illustrated by Angus McBride (Osprey, ), 48pp -- .


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Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean from the seventh to the tenth century A.D. by Aly Mohamed Fahmy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean, from the seventh to the tenth century A.D. (studies in naval organisation). Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean from the seventh to the tenth century A.D. Cairo, National Publication & Print.

House, (OCoLC) Online version: Fahmy, Aly Mohamed. Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean from the seventh to the tenth century A.D. Cairo, National Publication & Print. House, (OCoLC) Muslim naval organisation in the eastern Mediterranean from the seventh to the tenth century A.D.

by Fahmy, Aly Mohamed and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Muslim Sea-Power in the Eastern Mediterranean.

From the Seventh to the Tenth Century A.D. (Stdies in Naval Organisation). by Aly Mohamed Fahmy. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Ships, Medieval -- Mediterranean Region.

Mediterranean Region -- History, Naval. Notes. First ed. published in under title: Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean, from the seventh to the tenth century A.D. Bibliography: p.

Language. English Dewey Number. // 22 Libraries Australia ID. ; Contributed by. Aly Mohamed Fahmy, Muslim Sea-power in the Eastern Mediterranean: From the Seventh to the Tenth Century, University of London and The Lawbook Exchange Ltd War and Peace in the Law of Islam.

Amr himself was no fan of the sea, writes historian Aly Mohamed Fahmy (Muslim Sea-Power in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A.D.). In a letter to Umar, he sums up the traditional Bedouin attitude to salt water.

^ See, e.g., Aly Mohamed Fahmy, Muslim Sea-Power in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A.D. (Studies in Naval Organisation) (Alexandria: Tipografía Don Bosco, ); Archibald R.

Lewis, Naval Power and Trade in the Medi­. MUSLIM SEA-POWER IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN FROM THE SEVENTH TO THE TENTH CENTURY A.D. By ALY MOHAMED FAHMY. xi, ; bibliog.; appendices; index. London: Luzac and Co., 20s. It is once again realized in our day, as it was realized by Gibbon and Reiske, that neither Byzantium nor the Saracen Empire can be properly studied and.

Vol. 14, No. 1, Muslim Sea-Power in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A. by Aly Mohamed Fahmy.

Muslim Sea-Power in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A. by Aly Mohamed Fahmy (pp. The History of the Muslim Naval Army During the 'Abbasid Era 1,2 Article (PDF Available) in Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences January.

The Muslim world. Fahmy, A.M. Mu slim Sea Power in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A.D. Cairo: National Publication & Print. House, Fahmy, A.M.

Muslim Naval Organization in the Eastern Mediterranean from the 7 th to the 10 th AD. Cairo: National Publication & Print. House, Procopius. Fahmy, Aly Mohamed MUSLIM SEA POWER IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN From the Seventh to the Tenth Century A.

Cairo National Publication & Printing House First Edition Very Good+ Rebound in black boards with gilt lettering to spine with original wraps within. 2 Blank white stickers covering circulation numbers- no other markings.

Fahmy, Aly Mohamed, Muslim Sea Power in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Centuries (London, ). Fernández-Armesto, Felipe, ‘Naval Warfare after the Viking Age, c.

’, Medieval Warfare, ed. Maurice Keen (Oxford, ), Flatman, Joe, Ships and Shipping in Medieval Manuscripts (London, ). One of the main features of this site is the bibliographies drawn from the research for a forthcoming maritime history of the world.

The list is not intended to be exhaustive, but recommendations are r 1: The Rivers and Seas of Ancient EgyptBreasted, James Henry.

Ancient Records of Egypt: Historical Documents from the Earliest Times. The Coinage of the Arab Amirs of CreteMuslim Sea-Power in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A.D.

"The Bulgars in the Balkans and the Occupation of Corinth in the Seventh Century," Speculum, XXV. Fahmy, Aly M. Muslim Sea-Power in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century AD.

Cairo: National Publication & Printing House, Muslim Naval Organisation in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century AD. The Arab conquests of the seventh to first half of the ninth centuries resulted in Arab domination, but in the second half of the tenth century Byzantium regained its hegemony in the eastern Mediterranean.

In the tenth and 11th centuries an increasing role in Mediterranean trade was played by Italian and other Western European coastal city.

Rome Military mid-fourth century to the mid-third century BC; Rommel Recaptures Cyrenaica, January ; Russian Weapons, that are currently in service Saxon Army ; Soviet Aircraft of Operation Barbarossa; The Bourbon Restoration Armies; The Imperial Roman Principate Army; 15 cm F 55, 60 & 60F; A Lesson of History: The Luftwaffe.

Muslim Naval Organization in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A.D. 2nd ed. Cairo: National Publication & Printing House, García Moreno, L. “Creation of Byzantium’s Spanish Province: Causes and Propaganda.”Byzantion 66 (): – Goitein, S.

World Civ Exam 4. STUDY. Flashcards. Learn. Write. Spell. Test. PLAY. Match. Gravity. Created by. Gbvhfhj. Terms in this set (83) Dar-al-Islam "the House of Belief" Name of countries and people who profess belief in islam, where Islam does not prevail and Muslims cannot freely practice their religion.

It marked the beginning of a conflict. Coordinates. Phoenicia (/ f ə ˈ n ɪ ʃ ə /; from Ancient Greek: Φοινίκη, Phoiníkē) was an ancient Semitic-speaking thalassocratic civilization that originated in the Levant region of the eastern Mediterranean, specifically Lebanon, west of the Fertile Crescent.

It was concentrated along the coast of modern Lebanon and included parts of which are now coastal Syria and northern Capital: Byblos (– BC), Tyre (– BC).

Fahmy, Aly Mohamed Muslim naval organization in the eastern Mediterranean, from the seventh to the tenth century A.D.: 2d.

ed., Cairo, National Publication & Printing House (UMD) *Arabs*VII*VIII*IX*X*. century church constantinople emperor greek history byzantium imperial east christian rome paris roman thus constantine john monks upon west vol patriarch influence eastern Other readers will always be interested in your.

conquered many of the Greek city-states of the Peloponnese during the seventh century major sea power in easter Mediterranean Defeated by the seleucids Greece Hellenistic age. Seleucids. a Muslim ruler who became caliph in A.D. and made Arabic the official language of government in all Muslim lands.

'Mapping the Chinese and Islamic Worlds: Cross-Cultural Exchange in Pre-Modern Asia is a book well worth reading and pondering. It offers valuable insights into the historical exchanges, through the aegis of geography, between the Chinese and Muslim by: История еврейского народа, Крестовые походы.

Взгляд с востока. Мусульманские перспективы. Judging from excavations of shipwrecks (the Yassý Ada ship of the seventh century, the Bozburun ship whose timbers were felled inand the early eleventh-century Serçe Limani ship, all from within modern Turkey, and the thirteenth-century Contarina ship found near Venice), such ships averaged around 20 meters (c.

/2 ft.) in overall. First ed. published in under title: Muslim sea-power in the eastern Mediterranean, from the seventh to the tenth century A.D.

Physical Description: xiii, p. illus., maps. 24 cm. Locate a Print Version: Find in a library. Bachrach, David S WARFARE IN TENTH-CENTURY GERMANY Over the course of half a century, the first two kings of the Saxon dynasty, Henry I () and Otto I (), waged war across the length and breadth of Europe.

Ottonian armies campaigned from the banks of the Oder in the east to the Seine in the west, and from the shores of the.

A book, called the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, written by a Graceo-Egyptian sailor in the first century A.D., gives a very detailed and interesting account of Indian trade from the author’s personal knowledge. He came to India and found the Indian coast studded with ports and harbors, carrying on brisk trade with foreign countries.

Full text of "A Short History Of The Middle East" See other formats. Anglo-Saxon Perceptions of the Islamic World; Fahmy, A. M., Muslim Sea-Power in the Eastern Mediterranean, from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A. (London, ) Farrell, R. T., ‘The Archer and Associated Figures on the Ruthwell Cross – A Reconsideration’, in Bede and Anglo-Saxon England: Papers in Honour of the th Anniversary.

The rise of Muslim power in the east Mediterranean during the seventh century presaged new commercial and military challenges. By that time Hispanic urban society had lost most of the vigor and prosperity that it had known during the high Roman period.

They have already published significant contributions to the re-interpretation of the First Crusade – I mention Riley-Smith’s own book on the subject, published in ,1 John France’s military history of the crusade,2 and Marcus Bull’s study of lay piety in south western France in the eleventh century 3 – and we can no doubt look.

‘The Fatimid Quarter-dinar in Southern Italy and the Imitation Tari of Salerno and Amalfi’ (New York, NY: American Numismatics Society, ), 1–De Souza, P., ‘Western Mediterranean Ports in the Roman Empire, First Century B.C. to Sixth Century A.D.’, Journal of Mediterranean Studies, 10 (): –Di Pietro, R.

and. Full text of "A Short History Ofthe Middle East From Rise Islam To" See other formats. Fahmy, Aly Mohamed. Muslim Naval Organization in the Eastern Mediterranean from the Seventh to the Tenth Century A.D.

2nd ed. Cairo: National Publication & Printing House, García Moreno, L. “Creation of Byzantium’s Spanish Province: Causes and Propaganda.”Byzantion 66 (): – Goitein, S. The broader Muslim counterattack to the Crusaders eventually came under the direction of Salah al-Din (Saladin) (d.

), a unifier of various Muslim factions in the eastern Mediterranean. An ethnic Kurd, he hailed from a family of soldiers of fortune in the employ of the Zengid Dynasty’s Nur al-Din, a vassal of the Seljuq Turks.

The Christians of the seventh century had insensibly relapsed into a semblance of paganism; their public and private vows were addressed to the relics and images that disgraced the temples of the East; the throne of the Almighty was darkened by a cloud of martyrs, and saints, and angels, the objects of popular veneration; and the Collyridian.

Mediterranean ports (Chaturvedi and Saigal ). Whereas, navigation in the eastern part of which began in the Ist Century A.D. leading to the Mahan’s famous and popular book, The Influence of Sea Power upon History (), which appeared inshows how a skilfully cultivated strategic gaze.Eastern and central Europe and Russia, the Ottoman Empire, the Mediterranean and Egypt and north-west India, Greece and Armenia in the 19th century cannot be understood without some view of Jews.

Conversely, Jews do what they can to obscure the issues, as any history texts prove; it's painful to consider the waste of effort by students at all.Two significant events mark the change in political tide.

First, the increasing assertiveness of the Ottoman Empire in the Eastern Mediterranean, which coincided with a new bout of Islamic expansionism – ultimately bringing the Mughal dynasty to India – as well as the re-opening of the Mediterranean route for Indian goods.